56 year old breast cancer surviver - soy products and breast cancer survivors

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soy products and breast cancer survivors - 56 year old breast cancer surviver


Answer: Summary: The current consensus among health experts who study soy is that breast cancer survivors can safely eat these foods. Emerging research suggests that soy foods may decrease the likelihood of breast cancer recurrence in women with a history of the disease. Consistent findings from population studies indicate no increased risk for breast cancer survivors who consume soyfoods. In fact, limited evidence shows the potential for greater overall survival and perhaps decreased recurrence, among women a year or more after .

Mar 07,  · New research finds eating soy milk, edamame and tofu does not have harmful effects for women with breast cancer, as some have worried. In fact, for some breast cancer survivors, soy consumption was. Feb 01,  · We didn’t know, until the first human study on soy food intake and breast cancer survival was published in in the Journal of the American Medical Association, suggesting that “[a]mong women with breast cancer, soy food consumption was significantly associated with decreased risk of death and [breast cancer] recurrence.” Followed by another study, and then another, all with /5(79).

Prostate and breast cancer rates are lower in Asian countries where soy foods are a regular part of an overall healthy diet. Soy in natural food form such as tofu, edamame and soy milk is safe for consumption, even for people with a cancer diagnosis. Cancer patients do not need to eliminate all sources of soy food from their diet. Apr 29,  · Some studies even show that a diet high in soy didn’t increase the chances of developing breast cancer and may even reduce that risk. “The current research does not support avoiding whole soy foods, even for cancer patients or survivors,” Levy says. Soy might lower the risk of other cancers. Soybeans, soy nuts and edamame all contain fiber.

Apr 06,  · April 5, -- For years, breast cancer survivors were often counseled to avoid soy foods and supplements because of estrogen -like effects that might theoretically cause breast tumors to .